Rugby Coaching Blog | Professional Rugby Advice & Coaching


A scrum drill – a bit controversial though by David Clarke
July 5, 2011, 2:24 pm
Filed under: Dan Cottrell, Rugby Drills | Tags: , ,

I like the idea behind this session, but you might think there are some problems with the players flying off their feet.

But good for looking at scrum body profiles. Perhaps it would be good to put some weight on the bags. A cheap alternative to a scrum machine?

Dan

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13 Comments so far
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Weight on the bags would help.
Also, a much smaller gap. Since the bag isn’t moving towards the player, the distance the player covers before contact is not realistic.
Since the bag isn’t moving, the player should be set up and 1/2 his reach, not his full reach to the bag.

Comment by CB

“set up AT 1/2 his reach…”, not “and 1/2 his reach…”.

Comment by CB

my question is will there be control on not pushing before the ball is put in as a safety precaution?

Comment by Warren Chimene

thanks a tonne its a good drill

Comment by Warren Chimene

I think this is more likely to lead to poor engagement techniques than good ones. The emphasis should be on chasing the hit (leg drive, squeeze + maximum aggression) I don’t see any of this here. In fact all the boys are finnishing not having moved their feet and flat on their face. The scrum engagement is all about what happens emediatly after the hit, is’nt it?

Comment by Mark Irwin

The drill is fine as long as the player understand you are looking at bodyshape and first explosive movement… Thats it!!

I did notice Hookers feet positioning vs props feet positioning. Also very important along with short leavers and flat back.

This drill can probably be used as a step to progress towards another drill, but NOT on its own as its advertises to many potentially bad habits.

There is no hit and chase with “Post engagement” feet positioning
There is no Core stabilising eliment
There is no “Strong Binding” which contributes to shape
Going off feet
Distance etc

Controversial indeed!!!

Comment by Armand Roux

Maybe the resting player could ‘straddle & squeeze’ over the bag to provide some weight / resistance ?

Comment by roninrugby

My impression, I think they’d get more out of coming together in pairs. Not crashing into each other. Bind then try to drive each other back.

That said, in the video they’re too far away from the bags. The red head can barely touch it. He even missed touching the bag at least once. If you insist on using this drill then move them closer to the bags and put weight on it. Don’t let them leave thier feet. Make them drive it at least for a moment

Comment by Michael

Looks more like a tackling practice to me. Questionable judgement whether brings anything materially positive to safety and effectiveness of front row engagement.

Comment by Oxonref

As a front row player my self I believe this drill is hugely flawed.
1. As CB pointed out your opposition move towards you, in this drill you are not taking any kind of hit even like the one you get off a scrum machine.
2. As a starting point for new guys maybe, but working individually is not what you need when it requires the front 3 to work on the engage together to have any real effect. It really needs the front 5 (or 8) to function as one for successful scrummaging.

Comment by Coops

or 8*. don’t know what the smiley is about

Comment by Coops

I find it quite worrying that some coaches actually find this drill relevant to scrummaging or tackling! Its just fun time for 7 year olds surely!!

Comment by Mark

Unfortunately, this seems to be another example of a Coach trying to be clever. Inventing what he thinks is a new drill.

It doesn’t serve any practical purpose. Because it’s an artificial set-up and there isn’t any resistance it doesn’t aid hit-power development. The distance from the mark is huge. Consequently it cannot aid development of good body position in the scrum. And it could actually be dangerous if used in isolation. Because it could give players an artificial expection of what to expect when Scrummaging.

All in all. I struggle to find anything positive in this particular drill. I’d bin it.

Go 2v1 or 3v2 live Scrummaging at 50%. Then build intensity. Use a white line as the mark and as a goal to drive opposition back.

Comment by Mikey




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