Rugby Coaching Blog | Professional Rugby Advice & Coaching


The absolutely spot on basics of a good tackle by David Clarke


The R80 series of videos give some good technical methods and this is one of the simplest and most basic.

Watch for the boxer stance and approach and how square the tackler remains during the tackle.

Since the drill concentrates on technique, it is worth “suiting up” the tackler so he can make multiple rugby tackles.

Overall a good rugby tackling drill that is simple to set up and easy to observe for good technique.

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Switch plays with Shane Williams by David Clarke

Here is a video I shot with Shane Williams a couple of summers ago with Powerade.

It makes players work hard to cut angles before changing the direction of play with a switch or cut pass.

It can be done well in front of the defence, or right in front of the defence.

Better Rugby Coaching



Day fifteen of the August pre season training tips: warm ups by David Clarke

August 15

Warm ups

I am going to be a little controversial here. You don’t need to warm up.

There I said it.

Actually, you need to change the mindset to “preparing to train or play”. The mind and body need to be switched into action. That cannot be done immediately. Spend some time gradually building up the intensity.

What needs to be in your pre season warm up (last time I use that expression in this piece)

1. A game (like touch rugby or rugby netball) – this will get players onto the pitch quicker.
2. Some raising of the heart rate – this can be done in a game.
3. An increase in mental arousal – to put players in the right frame of mind (again can be done in a game).
4. Some movements and contact which start to replicate the exercises ahead.
5. A minute or two for players to “stretch” themselves if they want to. Players who are stiff or recovering from injury might use this time to activate their muscles. Others will simply run around with a ball.

Anecdotally, I used these activities before sessions most of last season when I was in charge of teams. I can report no pulled or strained muscles during the sessions.
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Day eight of August pre season training tips: tackling by David Clarke

August 8

Tackling

You have got to start tackling at some stage in pre season, but when? Why not work on the elements of tackling, breaking it down into component parts. Then put it all together closer to the first proper match.

If you have six sessions before your first game then try this out:
Session 1: Footwork for tackling. Working on getting correctly aligned to make front on or side on tackles. You can use touch rugby or tag rugby where the player has two hand touch or tag the ball carrier on the hips.
Session 2: Shoulders in. In a very small area, players work on their shoulder contact with the ball carrier.
Session 3: Grip work. Grip and holding onto the ball carrier. A static ball carrier is gripped and then starts to move.
Session 4: Pairs. Working together to make tackles. Low impact, walking rugby, with one player focusing on ball.
Session 5: Rough and tumble. Five metre box, 3 v 3 full contact, with a turnover and restart at the end of the box if a ruck or maul forms.
Session 6: Full tackling session.

You can revise each session at the start of the next session to build into one full session.

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New warm up drill video by David Clarke

Rugby IQ has some great videos for rugby training. Here is a really good one on agility and support play.

There have been devised by the guys at Rugby IQ who include the Springbok assistant coach Gary Gold. He writes in this month’s International Rugby Technical Journal.

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Attack into defence by David Clarke

Here is a rugby drill I did about three years ago. It is easy to set up and works on players making the transition from defence to attack. It is a Smart Session.

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Active rugby warm up routine by David Clarke

Here is a warm up routine that has the following great attributes:
1. It works the whole body.
2. It’s organisational – it promotes teamwork.
3. It’s reactive – there is no set pattern.
4. It is rugby related.

AND, it is easy to replicate across all levels.

Better Rugby Coaching