Rugby Coaching Blog | Professional Rugby Advice & Coaching


Scrummaging square and balanced by David Clarke

Real power and precision in this video.

Read about the biomechanics of these scrums from the works of Doug McClymont who worked with New Zealand scrum guru in the International Rugby Technical Journal.

Better Rugby Coaching



All Blacks’ preparation by David Clarke

Here is a little video with the All Blacks preparing for their match against Cardiff in 2008.

http://www.allblacks.com/flash/embed.cfm?id=5458

There are a couple of things to notice, like the movement in the lineout and formation of the scrum. Read Doug McClymont in Rugby Coach Newsletter on how the All Black scrums are formed and the jumpers lifted.

Better Rugby Coaching



A little known way of powering up your front row by David Clarke
December 16, 2008, 9:58 am
Filed under: Dan Cottrell, Rugby Coaching, Rugby Skills | Tags: , , , , ,

Most props will bind tight to the hooker. It makes sense. The opposition will want to isolate the hooker so he cannot strike for the ball as effectively. The opposition tight head (or right side prop) with his hooker will pressurise your hooker.

To counter this, the props will grab a great lump of their hooker’s shirt or shorts, normally under the arm and pull in the hooker.

But this is counter productive.

Many of your props will do weights. Ask them whether is easy to lift dumb bells with wide arms or with the elbows bent, thus pulling the dumb bell into the shoulders. The bent elbow method is easier, because the prop’s arms are stronger through this range.

In which case, the prop should use the “short arm” method, with a bent elbow, probably gripping the number on the hooker’s back.

Your props will be squarer and your push and protection stronger.

I mention this method because Andrew Millward, one of the main contributors to Secrets of the Front Row and now academy manager at the Ospreys reminded me about it last night.

It ties in nicely with Doug McClymont’s explanation of the Total Impact Method of scrummaging he developed with All Black scrum guru, Mike Cron, in this month’s Rugby Coach Newsletter.



England’s lineout is saved by David Clarke

In a remarkable piece of good luck (and you can decide for yourself who was the lucky one) I bumped into Phil Vickery and Steve Borthwick yesterday.

I was on my way back from a meeting in Bramley with the Rugby Coach publishers and an old friend of mine asked me to meet up with him. He is a football fan (well he supports Chelsea anyway) and he said he would see me at Pennyhill Park Hotel.

On my way I remembered that the England rugby team were staying there but thought little more of it.

I arrived, walked into the hotel bar, and passed a serious looking Martin Johnson and his coaching team of Graham Rowntree and John Wells. Now in my bag I had my new DVD, “Everything You Need to Know For Coaching Rugby“. I decided this was not the moment to hand a free copy over to Johnson.

I caught up with my mate and we laughed at the coincidence. Then in walks Phil Vickery. Phil has just endorsed our Secrets of the Front Row report, plus given us some signed shirts from his Raging Bull business. I went over to him to say thank you. And also to give our new How to Win the Lineout book which I had as a spare copy in my bag. And in walks Steve Borthwick. Both are charming men and Borthwick jokes about the need for the lineout book, though it is safe to say that it is one area England can feel quite pleased with.

So after a brief light-hearted exchange, I return to my friend, leaving the book with the England forwards. So I expect the England lineout to be in good hands tomorrow!

The coincidences didn’t stop there, because when I arrived home, I had an email from Doug McClymont, who worked with Mike Cron, the All Blacks scrum guru. He has just sent me the methods that make the New Zealand scrum one of, if not the best set piece in the world. More on that in the next Rugby Coach Newsletter…